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defensive and also still a shrine where thousands it of people come each day to pay their respects to those who died here. we'll have complete coverage confident crisis in ukraine from here in kiev. also on the ground from correspondents in crimea at the top of the hour. erin be? >> looking forward to seeing you in a few minutes. >>> emotion dominating day two of the murder trial involving oscar pistorius. at times the testimony proved too much for the one-time athlete and a star witness. robyn curnow is out front in the south africa. >> it was awful. >> a key witness breaking down on the second day of oscar pistorius' murder trial. the olympic runner's neighbor testified she heard blood curdling screams the night reeva was killed followed by four gunshots. the defense tried to poke holes in the neighbor's story. >> the question was not that difficult. shall i repeat it again? please listen carefully. just listen to the question please. >> the defense went on to question the neighbor's credibility. >> you heard that out of a closed toilet and a half, 177 meters away? >> then in graphic deta
screams the night reeva steenkamp was killed, followed by four gunshots. the defense tried to poke holes in the neighbor's story. >> just listen carefully to the question. the question was not that difficult. shall i repeat it again? please listen carefully. just listen to the question please. >> the defense went on to question the neighbor's credibility. >> you heard that out of a closed toilet and a half, 177 meters away? >> then in graphic detail, the defense explained steenkamp would not have been able to scream after the fourth and fatal shot. >> with the head shot, she would have dropped down immediately. when you say, when you talk about the screaming, whatever interpretation, after the last, it cannot be. >> as i stated yesterday, i heard her voice just after the last shot faded away. >> the defense claiming the screams that night were from pistorious. they say high pitched yells occurred after he realized he had accidentally shot his girlfriend of three months and not the intruder. prosecutors allege allege pistorious killed his girlfriend in a fit of rage and called two more ne
. it is a surprise exercise of combat readiness. agoas planned a long time with the defense ministry -- they told me about it earlier. he had all the orders ready. exercise has been finished. yesterday, i ordered the troops to return to their military bases. what could trigger a possible use of military force? it is only an extreme case. the legitimate president requested russia to use the military force to defend the lives and health of ukrainians. --major concern is the situation that is happening. so many nationalists and radical rampant on the streets of kiev. the news media was chained on a square. handcuffed to some fixture. it was freezing cold. he was holed up in a basement and tortured. how do you define that? is this democracy? is this an expression of democracy? if all authorities are corrupt -- he has not been able to rob anything. there was none there. there was just one technical guide their -- there. i am an i.t. guy. could you let a woman out? he was shot dead right there. second i.t. guy was forced into the basement. he was burned alive. what we see that, we realize what the major c
on the table. that's what secretary of defense, chuck hagel, delivered today. we are going to send an aircraft wing that's been in poland, a nato ally to the west of ukraine, that's going to be extended. the u.s. is going to send more aircraft to the baltic state, north of the ukraine, also nato allies. more aircraft there. he is going to convenient nato ministers to talk about the next step. you have the carrot and the stick. if this doesn't change, the situation on the ground doesn't change, costs are going to be imposed. at the same time, we are going to demonstrate our commitment to those nato allies. you see them there, the ones in green along ukraine's western poured der. . >> jim sciutto live and michael holmes, we do have some breaking news right now from capitol hill. as jim was saying, what is being most used right now, words and statements. diplomacy in this crisis. there are about to be some words and statements coming from the u.s. congress. >> our deirdra walsh just spoke with ed royce, chairman of the foreign committee in the house. he said tomorrow that committee will hold a vo
, was to enhance the defense of our military facilities because they are constantly receiving threats, and we were aware of the armed nationalists moving in. now, russia has well-trained, well-equipped, now additional 16,000 or more, and vladimir putin was worried about enhancing the defense of his military facilities because they were constantly receiving threats. there is something i'd like to stress, however, he goes on to say. obviously, what i am going to say now is not within my authority, and we do not intend to interfere. however, we firmly believe that all citizens of ukraine, i repeat, wherever they live should be given the same equal right to participate in the life of their country in determining its future. my friends, we are seeing justification for intervention and serious intervention in eastern ukraine. so he goes on to further questions, and then he goes on to take a shot at the united states, saying our partners, especially in the united states, always clearly formulate their own geopolitical and state interests and follow them with persistence, then using the principle -- quote
the threat or use of force. and that none of their weapons will ever be used against ukraine except in self-defense or otherwise in accordance with the charter of the united nations. that clearly hasn't happened now, even though putin claims he's potential acting to protect the russian populace. >> no, it hasn't, but then again, you know, seen from not just russia, but many ukrainance as well, what happened was not like what happened in egypt with the overthrow of commune im. yanukovych was a repulsive ruler in many ways, but he wasn't elected. a large part of the ukrainian parliament is being chased out of kiev, you know, the representatives of the east and south, the parties which supported yanukovych. so it is highly questionable whether this government in kiev does have any degree of democratic legitimately. that's why, quite rightly, the west has gotten a promise of new elections in may, but of course the question is how one can hold free and fair elections with nationalist militia in control of with you pant of the country and russian soldiers in control of another. >> finally, the west is cl
heard it again today from the russian defense minister. he maintained that no, there are no russian soldiers occupying crimea as it stands. they maintain this position that they say it is local self-defense teams, local militias, and we only know on the ground what we see and what our own cfn teams have seen. there's some local militias but undoubtedly russian soldiers. not wearing the insignia but heavily armed, driving armored vehicles, some of those vehicles have russian registration plates. very difficult to see how negotiations can proceed when the russian position is just that they have not begun any occupation of ukrainian territory. >> phil black in moscow. as we mentioned at the top of the hour, russia is due to take part in nato's discussion of the cries in ukraine. john kerry is due to meet with his russian counterpart. kerry lamented russian's absence ever his counterparts from great britain and ukraine. >> we have our friends from ukraine and great britain, partners in the budapest agreement of 1994. we're missing one member, hopefully meet this afternoon with that indi
they are relenting. the troop buildup continues. the ukrainian coastal defense division is still pinned in. on the east coast of crimea, another military base is now encircled. and now border guards report seeing a massive buildup of military hardware on the russian side of the border. crimea is lost. kiev knows it. but how far did president putin's ambitions stretched. with one mighty turn to eastern ukraine. and is there anything to stop him? christian frazier, bbc news, sevastopol. >> big questions certainly. now to kiev. david stern is there for us. david, the prime minister of ukraine and the british foreign secretary have been speaking. what is their take at the moment? >> reporter: well, yes. as the crisis continues in crimea, the tension and worry and anger, among the ukrainian officials, is rising here. as you say. mr. william hague and the prime minister have been meeting. they have held a news conference. mr. hague said there will be consequences and costs to the russian actions. he promised a strong diplomatic and economic reaction, a response. but he said there was no military
with russia. discard what has failed, with this feckless policy. i would renew the missile defense program in the czech wouldic and in poland i have some nato exercises with the baltic states. bill thatexpand a targets individuals who are responsible for this. there are other things we can do. the initial signals out of encouraging as far as sanctions are concerned. >> i do know that. do think sanctions that were effective in iran would have the same kind of effect on vladimir putin? try thenk i would target individuals and the bank accounts and the ability to travel. i would try that first. then i would look at others. g-8.im out of the s.number of other cosmetic whate have to understand this guy is all about. kgb --n old i said, watching russia and watch ukraine. unfortunately, i was correct. >> there enough. -- fair enough. do you have enough leverage to make him feel the repercussions of what you have done so severely that he will change his policy? >> i do not think in the short term that there is anything right now that is draconian enough to make him change. of our policyn towards r
media quoting ukrainian defense saying this happened, but you have the russian defense ministry saying this didn't happen. can you clear this up for us? >> we have conflicting reports and russian media reporting this deadline was set at 5:00 local time tomorrow to surrender or face a storm of russian military force in response. we have spoken to defense officials who say yes, there was an ultimatum. the commander thwarted one of the vessels that blocked in the harbor there. and we are told that the forces have three choices. they can swear allegiance and surrender or face an attack. now a denial through russian state media from the black sea fleet. the russian black city fleet that there was any such ultimatum. we are being told that these ultimatums have been regular and constant since russian troops first showed up. at various military bases and installations across that region. russian forces have been saying we have a limited time. they have not been enforced. we have russian lawmakers dealing with a necations of territory. tell us about that. >> so a group of members of the russia
this budget request, one fact was front and center. nation's % of the budget, america's defense has never been more vital to our economic prosperity or global leadership. whether in the mideast, ukraine, europe or our own hemisphere, diplomacy is needed now more than ever. investments in diplomacy and development are returned to us in security and jobs. this budget funds the work that is required to sustain long-term investment while regular recognizing the fiscal constraints we face as a nation. details are online, i'll just hit a few highlights here. the overall request is $46.2 billion. the base budget of $40.3 billion is consistent with the f.y. 2014 level this will enable us to carry out our global, dip lo -- ur global diplomatic and other missions, honor our commitments o allies and partners, keep up wur opiece keap -- peacekeeping activities and respond to crises such as the typhoon in the fill peeps. it funds key programs in iraq and afghanistan and helps sustain hard-fought gains in afghanistan. the budget also enables us to respond to the ongoing humanitarian and refugee crisis
seen here in red. there you see it in the middle of the screen. ukraine's defense minister says they have warned officials to swear allegiance to the new crimean authorities, surrender, or face an attack. but russian media now saying reports of a russian ultimatum are, quote, utter rubbish. what we know right now is about 6,000 russian troops are in control of crimea. the european union demanding an immediate russian withdrawal. the secretary of state, john kerry, he's due to fly out tonight, to go to kiev in ukraine. he spoke moments ago at the state department, and he condemned russian's invasion of crimea as an incredible act of aggression. in moscow, russian's parliament is considering legislation that could ultimately lead to the annexation of crimea as russian territory. the russian president putin appears to be taking a very active role in military drills in western russia. the exercises involve about 150,000 troops, along with aircraft and ships. putin called for snap drills and surprise inspections throughout the region. let's go straight to the region, cnn's anderson c
failed with this policy that led us to where we are. i would renew the missile defense program in the czech republic and poland and probably have some nato exercises with particularly the bal baltic sta. obviously expand the magniski bill to target individuals that have to do with this, and the initial signals out of europe, the british and germans aren't encouraging sanctions. >> charlie: i do know that. do you think sanctions that were effective in iran would have the same kind of effect on vladimir putin? >> i think, first, i would try the magniski which targets individuals and their bank accounts and their ability to travel and all that. i would try that first. then, obviously, i would look at other areas. you know, throw them out of the g-8, of course. it should be the g-7. a number of other cosmetic kind of don't send our officials to the paralympics. but we have to understand what this guy is all about. he's an ogd kgb. in 2008, the debate i had with barack obama, i said at that time, watch russia and ukraine and, unfortunately, these many years later, i was correct. >>
our defense and cutting the army to the smallest we have had since world war ii. with uic americans who want our country to be engaged in events beyond our borders. i see americans who want an internationalist foreign policy. i see americans who want our country to stand with israel and our other partners. i see americans who are willing to spend their hard-earned tax dollars on effective foreign assistance and to strengthen the greatest military the world has ever known. i see here today americans who want america to lead. i have been around a long time. since the coolidge administration. you i have never seen this world in need of strong american readership than it is today. of these the events negotiations with iran which i hope to succeed but i doubt, when i see the slaughter in syria, when i see the chinese inserting themselves in asia, when i see significant cuts in foreign aid and also in our defense budget, i'm worried. my final word to you my dear and beloved friends, america -- israel needs you more today than ever before. thank you and god bless. [applause] >> senator jo
by reconsidering and now building the missile shield president obama has hit. don't cut the defense budget. we have the secretary of defense cutting while the russians history of defense is negotiating leases all around the world. primarily go after the keystone pipeline. take the price of oil because of the world market with oil, the price of oil will go down. the price of oil goes down below $89 per barrel, the russians are broke again. they need oil above $100 per barrel. the heavy political leverage coming from supplying the majority of other parts of europe. it translates into electricity. build terminals so that american natural gas can go there. he has played the long game and is doing it very well. stop thinking we're going to do this today or tomorrow. to this the idea five, seven years from now we are in a better position. jenna: thank you. jon: with midterm elections inching closer, new poll shows thethe holy key edge with ameris on matters they deal about most. new "washington post" post "abc news" poll shows 48% said democrats are more in touch with them on big issues compared with onl
are? >> reporter: well, i think i talked to a former defense minister and others today and people would find it laughable if it weren't so deadly serious that russian forces have not already intervened in crimea. obviously there is huge concern about russian forces extending into eastern ukraine, which we have not seen, thankfully. but there's nobody here that you talk to in kiev who believes that the forces were seeing on the ground in crimea, as our own people have been reporting and others have been reporting, are not russian forces. the idea that there are self-defense militias simply -- it defies credibility. >> and you know, the other part of the news conference, anderson, president putin described the overall situation in ukraine as an unconstitutional coo. do ukrainians that you've been talking to see this escalating in the next few days? >> reporter: you know, there's certainly a lot of concern about that and i think they are watching it very, very closely. i think it's certainly the fact that vladimir putin has not sent forces into eastern ukraine they would see as a pos
they have formed self-defense teams and took over the control of military bases. when i saw yesterday what they have taken over, they -- there are 22,000 troops and a lot of arms. but as i said, without a single shot, it is now in the hand of the ukrainian people. the people who were blocking -- >> let's get back out of this now and explain what's happened so far. from what we've heard so far, let's just go other the headlines. he's been speaking about 20 minutes now. we believe he's entertaining legitimate questions. he says this is a wrongful coup that has happened, that yanukovych was wrongful ly ousted. that the idea of sanctions should be very carefully examined because they will hurt everyone and all options are on the table for him. the first question, it seems that crimea is not the oend, ony the beginning. >> right. seems to me this is availed threat. he's saying unless i have a seat at the table in deciding what's going to happen in the future of the government of ukraine, we reserve the right to go further into russian ukraine. he's really giving no evidence of that. i think wha
and that the forces in southern ukraine are not troops but merely self-defense teams. putin is not taking the action of force off the table to protect russian-speaking ukrainians. he called them brothers in arms which is puzzling when you hear warning shots over the heads of unarmed ukrainian troops. the stand off begins with one russian soldier warning that he will shoot. ukrainian responds, america is with us. another ukrainian pleads, would you shoot the soviet flag and then asks to speak to the commander so they can negotiate. the russian tells the ukrainians to back off and warns he will shoot their legs if they keep advancing. but, look, who hasn't threatened to blast off their brother's kneecaps? diana magnay is on the ground there in kiev. i wonder what you make of the warning shots that were fired today. are tensions rising there? >> reporter: well, it's a very mysterious situation here. tensions seem pretty high and then the next moment you turn around and have ukrainian and russian forces sort of having a chat and exchanging fuel to fuel the russian generators. so it is a very strange sit
as we've been reporting all afternoon, jim. you saw the pictures coming out of the white house. defense secretary chuck hagel, cia director john brennan, talking about the situation in ukraine and discussing policy options. i should note, jim, that just outside the gates of the white house at this very moment there is a protest going on. some ukranians have gathered outside the north fence to talk about what they would like to see happen. they would like to see the u.s. get more involved. but as the hours go on, jim, i think we're going to get a clearer indication as to how this phone call went down between these two leaders. as you mentioned, they did speak a week ago friday. and you heard the president in the briefing room yesterday issuing that warning to vladimir putin that there would be costs if russia intervenes in ukraine. >> want to point out, jim, while those folks were meeting there in the white house for an emergency session in effect to discuss ukraine those pictures we just saw might explain that the president was on the phone with several world leaders including we now kn
. senator marco rubio mentioned a missile defense shield in eastern europe, but he wouldn't go any further than that. >> if you're asking me whether the u.s. should be taking military strikes against russian troops in ukraine or crimea, i would argue to you i don't think anyone is advocating for that. >> the obama administration is doing what it can to try to isolate moscow on the international stage. the u.s. and six other members of the g8 suspended a meeting to be held in june. members are likely to seek mediation. they're not crazy about economic sangs that might risk billions in trade between the e. urchlts and russia. one by one, the world leaders, the pope have come out urging restraint, but russia is forging ahead. this morning, foreign minister sergey lavrov insisted his government is acting in its own defense. here's nbc's jim maceda who has more from moscow. >> reporter: putin now has his hand on the russian crown jewel. crimea gives putin an essential warm water port, and it counters in his mind the nightmare scenario. that's what he sees as an ultranationalist government sudde
defense official is discussing ukraine with nato members in brusse brussels, as well. so, kristen, what's emerging, it seems in this -- from the swirl of diplomacy is a couple of end games. the russian plan and the western plan, if you will. washington and berlin pushing hard now for something that would include international observers to replace the russian or pro-russian forces in crimea, direct talks between russia and kiev, and new elections in may. now, reduction erussians want t return of viktor yanukovych to head a national unity government and new elections in december, so there's a gulf between the two sides, but at least the two sides are talking again. kristen if, that doesn't work, don't expect to see russian forces pulling back from crimea anytime soon. back to you. >> all right. jim maceda, thank you for that reporting from moscow. we appreciate it. >>> joining me now, california republican ed royce, chairman of the house foreign affairs committee, holding a hearing on ukraine tomorrow. thank you so much for joining me this morning, congressman. appreciate it. >> thank you
that the pentagon and the joint chiefs, the secretary of defense right now are going through all the scenarios and the options for the use of force. clearly, it's premature for us to even talk about the use of force. however, it is a possible outcome and needs to be planned, and it is what i would describe very robust detail. so a lot of options are out there. clearly, the united states as a first order would have to have what's known as a command and control type capability so if a decision was made to apply force, it's going to be a joint force. all the services and the different combat and commands will be involved and it will require some element that will allow you to tie it all together. that's taking place right now in terms of discussions in what's known as warning orders, in order to posture us, to make sure we're prepared. but all this is premature because there are other elements of power that have to be addressed and have to be exhausted. if the united states has declared and determined that this is in their national interest to get involved in some way, or to simply allow this to
he says they're local self-defense teams. why are they wearing uniforms similar to russians? he said they're available in shops across the union. he was asked if russians are involved in securing crimea? he said no repeatedly. that stands against teams on the ground are reporting that have spoken to soldiers and who have admitted they are russia. which explains why they're so well armed, driving armored vehicles and why army vehicles have russian plates. >> it's interesting in the of the phone call between merkel and problem. it says merkel expressed the opinion vladimir putin was in another world, did not seem teth t -- seem in reality. that's my translation. as someone reporting on putin for years, what's your take? is this somebody that disconnected from reality or somebody willing to say whatever he needs to say to accomplish what he needs to accomplish? >> i think putin is off viewed rightly as the ultimate pragmatist. he require rarely acts without . his take on what's going on on the ground and what western leaders believe is the claim to a threat to the ethnic russian populat
and defense secretary said he is beefing up a training mission and adding an air patrol mission. lawmakers are going tit for tat. that would confiscate assets if they slap sanctions on russia. they could vote on a non-binding sanction resolution. for now the west is more focused on economic aid to the ukraine. promising $15 billion in trade and economic and technical assistance. the u.s. and britain agreed in principal to deploy international observers to ukraine. the idea is to ease concerns after president putin indicated he was worried about those in ukraine. an excuse very few in washington are buying. >> we don't accept anything that president putin said as fact about why they had to protect the so-called ethnic minority in crimea. the other reasons that the russians have laid out as to why they took the action they did. >> joining me now foreign affairs reporter from paris is traveling with secretary kerry and as well joined by the chief national security correspondent. to you first. we know that kerry has spoken to russia's foreign minster. do we have any details about that meeting
. frugalityusterity and of the national defense. how do we project a state department policy if we are recovering from two wars and want to take the armed services back? >> with great difficulty. dimension is absence. this will not be a crisis that teachers u.s. military use of force. carriers are not going to the black sea. we are engaged at all, it is about what we say and do with our allies. we have no powerful course of instruments that can merge them on this front. by cap we learned anything about the way russia has made the moves? i've remember when georgia invaded the south. there was an interesting cyber attack that precluded that. i was wondering if you saw anything that happens in crimea that was similar? >> i think there is a lesson to be learned. i think the big lesson is to be learned from the administration. he got caught trying to negotiate a secret deal with putin about the missile defense system. russia may be violating the treaty without action by the administration. this administration has been pursuing an narrative that is just not accurate. it has put allies at a very disadvantage
an occupation when these are self-defense forces? these are not russian." that really dampened hopes of any meaningful progress. at least they've talked, and at least it has gone on longer than we thought. the other big news, of course, is the e.u. weighing in with a big financial package, offering $15 billion worth of aid. that comes after yesterday's announcement of a billion dollars of -- of loan guarantees from the u.s. the priority, aside from calming down the security situation in crimea, is, of course, to try and stabilize the ukrainian economy which is in a terrible way with the russians turning the screws still more. the finance ministry here have been frank. they say we've got no money left. the coffers are empty, it's been stolen. also in the east, we've seen more violence, clashes between pro-russian protesters and supporters of the ukrainian government. we've had the -- the government offices there occupied first by the pro-russians, pushed out, and then the pro-ukrainians. and now again today, the pro-russians taking control of that building and putting their flag up. so a pre
. the latest ultimatum coming to according to ukraine's defense ministry from russia's black sea fleet, saying if ukrainian bases don't evacuate by 5:00 p.m. local time, they will storm them, russian troops will storm them. given that most people acree at this point, russia has complete operational control over crimea, it is not clear what this latest escalation will accomplish. but it is also not clear from what we've been seeing what the endgame here is for russia. it is bizarre that it is almost old news that russian troops fanned out across crimea and surrounding ukrainian military bases. we're hearing disturbingly about other bases in eastern ukraine where russian flags are hosted in eastern ukraine. pro-russians took over a floor of a main administrative building. >> those who are in crimea and if they present any legal and i would raise it again, any legal power in crimea, they try to squeeze ukrainian efforts, come to seize ukrainian property, tried to disarm the ukrainian army. >> reporter: there has been tough talk from western leaders like brit intaken's foreign -- britain's foreign
doing massachusetts. the same day that massachusetts came out, this court decided environmental defense versus duke which decided -- even when a defined term is construed a particular way, it doesn't mean the same term can be construed differently where context -- cannot be construed differently where context requires. that is why massachusetts, after indeed holding that the definition of pollutant included greenhouse gases, didn't go there -- stop there. it asked whether applying it to the title ii provisions on motor vehicles would yield extreme measures or counterintuitive results. only then did they direct the epa to apply the definition. they understood that the literal definition of pollutant was sufficiently broad that it should not be applied without some additional analysis of the context of the provisions. >> what else does it cover other than the -- mobile vehicles? >> there are multiple places where it appears in the act. they have interpreted the words, any air pollutant to mean any subset of the pollutants that this definition -- >> that is because the section that it is i
issued an ultimatum warping ukraine's military. the russian ministry of defense called that report total nonsense. president obama meeting with israeli netanyahu vowed to keep up the diplomatic pressure on russia. >> with impunity to put its soldiers on the ground and violate basic principles, and i think the strong kind of name it's received from indicates the degree to which russia is on the wrong side of history on this. >> president obama said from ukrainian government. >> those in crimea, they are illegal. i would repeat. illegal they tried to squeeze ukrainian assets, tried to confiscate ukrainian property, disarm the ukrainian army for these kind of actions, they have to know. >> leaders in kiev and other world capitols fear ukraine's eastern regions may be next. russian foreign minister certain alavrov said troops in ukraine after the recent politicaltrition. >> this is a question of defending our citizens and compatriots. those who are trying to interpret the situation as a sort of aggression and threatening us with sanctions and boycotts, these are the same partners who have be
a peaceful resolution. we want to reiterate our concerns to abide by the provisions of the 1994 defense memorandum. we guarantee the sovereignty and integrity of ukraine. we note that the provision calls for the one. this is even more and represents an opportunity to peacefully resolve the current crisis. we are encouraged by indications that government of ukraine is taking steps to ensure political inclusiveness in the governance of the country. we believe this is a prudent way of addressing one of the underlying causes of the disputes and an early return to peace and stability. this remains relevant under the circumstance. we urge all concerned to refrain from provocative action that will precipitate now and in the future. >> i think the representative of nigeria for the statement. i look forward to the representative of the republic of korea. >> thank you, madam president. the republic of korea remained deeply concerned over the situation in ukraine, particularly the escalation of tensions in the crimean region. given the situation, we call on all parties to exercise maximum restrain
as a government, you need to put it to a good purpose either enhancing productivity or providing defense or essential services. the u.s. has the advantage of being a reserve currency country. we can issue treasuries at low interest rates. that is essentially what supports our fiscal -- >> we could talk all morning about fiscal multipliers. unfortunately, mr. putin is speaking in russia. i believe he is in his residence. he is looking casual this morning. >> you can't beat some of these headlines -- >> he has his shirt on. >> that is an exclusive. clarida takes a shot at putin. >> a tie and jacket for mr. putin. bc is he met with the d'amico meth and he -- he says he with viktor yanukovich and he is alive. he has no sympathy for him. take a look at the features. your cohorts in crime suggest, do we just ignore all of this ukraine chat? >> the reality is, there is no serious prospect of the u.s. or nato escalating this. as tragic as it is for the ukrainian people, it looks as though it is now not going to become a larger geopolitical impact. that is why you see the markets rebounding. >> i
it could incite violence on cinco de mayo. joining us are defense attorneys and former prosecutors. good to see you both. there is a long and distinguished history of the supreme court saying that the rights of students can be compromised if what they are communicating could insight violence. so what about this, doug? >> well, you look at the ninth circuit opinion and it's very clear. they cite tinker versus des moines. >> famous case. >> famous case. students are free to express their first amendment views, however, if it interferes with the propered a handwriting of the school. >> right. and in this case the school felt that what the students did by wearing the american flag could incite violence between the students because of the past history between the mexicans and -- >> what other students? hispanic students? >> right. >> wouldn't hispanic students who came here to america, many of them, some of them born here in america, wouldn't they be proud of the american flag? see, i don't get this. >> i think they would be but i think under the circumstances of this particular incident, the
. it was designed to improve ukraine's defense capabilities as well as strengthen ties between kiev and western europe. so that meeting currently under way. we don't have a timetable as to when that will end. we do expect ukrainian ambassador to speak here in brussels following that meeting. so far the messaging coming out of brussels is one of easing tensions, calming things down as well as establishing a nato support for ukraine's sovereignty. deb. >> thank you so much, erin. hopes ukrainian people turning so suddenly with this invasion by russia. we'll check back with you later on. ukraine isn't waiting for the white house to do something. u.s. mobilizing troops and calling up reservists. they have lost a crucial part of its power, the navy, which may have abandoned kiev. ian in the capital and joins me from there. ian, the navy, they seem to have sided with the russians. >> reporter: debra, this has been a lot of drama in kiev trying to figure out exactly what is going on. what we heard initially was that the ukrainian naval chief said he was defecting to the republic of crimea. this would
out of the loop on some of these decisions. it's not going a defense she is going to use. her plan is to stick with president obama, but it makes it hard for her to charter her own course as she heads out on this campaign. we have seen ian senator john mccain who you know is very supportive of her in the past and joked about her and said she was totally wrong about this. >> julie, this shows the long march to entering the race for hillary clinton, the longer this drags out, the more hits she is going to take. whatever issue of the day comes up, it's a link somehow to hillary clinton. >> absolutely. especially if it's something that happened on foreign policy when she was secretary of state. i mean, that red reset button moment we are going to see played over and over again. i actually am interested to hear from her on what she was thinking at that time and whether she thinks that was the right policy given what we have seen now. >> and gene robinson, there are going to be a lot of issues that she is going to be exposed on if she runs moving forward and a lot of people think she is
key for the u.s., allies on the western border, allies we have defense agreements with. and really the front of an east-west pull, not a cold war necessarily but cold war-like. >> let's role play. i'm russia. you guys let's just game out how this goes forward. the state of play is i went in. they want me there. this is my place. i have military there. you butt out. these days are over of me not being able to expand, they want me, there i'm there. they are unstable, not me. talking about the ukraine. what's the best response from west? >> first of all the united states has to get on the same page with the european allies and that's the challenge because those european allies have depended on that russian gas. russia has more leverage or them than we do, especially germany. when the u.s. went out and said maybe we'll kick russia out of the g-8 the germans said no, we're not on that. obama's first challenge is unify the european allies, take leadership over that and figure out what they can do. if russia can divide with american allies we can't exercise much loench. >> strong point es
the cold war. we do not need the star wars defense shield. isolateto economically russia and show them that the $60 billion that he spent for the olympics is almost equal to for the 36pense olympics. this off of twitter -- deeply concerned that russia will expand its military intervention in ukraine. sts"a needs to impose "co now. here's bethany, columbia, maryland. independent line. that the media is and they vilify the russian president and there is still those cold war mentality that the russians are always wrong and they are always bad and they are some sort of monsters. go towesterners the rescue. that is not always true. host: what you think the proper response should be? they should let the russians and ukrainians figure out what is best for them. there is truth about the outer-nationalists. they are not good for the ukraine. -- majority of ukrainians they voted for the president. the president was elected. he won the majority. from the very beginning they hated him and they wanted to depose him. westhey think of the automatically takes up their side. conflictsilitary happen, do
on their own self-defense? they have subcontracted out all of their defense to the united states assuming we would come to their aid. if they were stronger militarily, would putin be able to make those moves? i don't think so. >> i think it would be useful if europe spent more on its defense and i would not lump all the european nations together. i think france and great britain spend a fair amount on their defense. it would be useful if they spent more but i don't think that's the key to resolving this crisis. >> how far -- keep going. >> it would also be useful for the european union and individual european states to levy sanctions on russian leaders. russian leaders keep their money in europe. that would be a strong disincentive for aggression. >> on vladimir putin? >> yes. >> when he decides he's not going to send them all the natural gas, one-third of which they consume from russia, and they are paying through the nose and their economy still isn't recovered, why would they do that? >> that's a fair question. keep in mind if putin doesn't sell it to europe, he doesn't sell it. russia ne
defense installation in eastern europe, for russian law banning americans from adopting russian children. then, as if things weren't troubling enough came the arrival in moscow of national security agency leaker edward snowden. russia welcomed him and granted him temporary asylum. obama was stunned by the move. cancelled a one on one meeting with putin before the g-20 meetings in russia last september. but he still insisted that things were okay between him and the russian president. >> i know the press likes to focus on body language and he's got that kind of slouch, looking like the bored kid in the back of the classroom. but the truth is, when we're in conversations together, often times it's very productive. >> vladimir putin did not agree, instead he added fuel to the fire, speaking directly to the american people in a letter published in the new york times last september saying, millions around the world increasingly see america not as a model of democracy, but as relying solely on brute force. cobbling coalitions together under the slogan, you're either with us or against us. and
as for the ultimatum the ad the russian defense ministry and this is now according to russian media sources of calling it utter nonsense you know the year the regional talk of this ultimatum was i a russian news agency report. interfax cited someone close to the ukrainian defense ministry. it was hearsay based on hearsay based on hearsay. you have to take everything very prudently in a story like this on a lot of the russian news agencies in particular have the most to you you almost feel like you can use to tyneside as sounding boards to lead to float. sometimes you know rumors and theories. suppose the facts that turned out to be on refuted afterwards of what i can tell you is the situation the past couple of days here from where we are in the administrative capital of the crime yes in pro ball has been really extraordinary on and surreal at the same time. um it's not a classic coup d'etat in the sense of personal coup d'etat czar typically internal affairs states again states. this is it's basically green men in camouflage uniforms who as i actually now have their own twitter has tagged the silent
, defensive stocks. consumer staples up the same as consumer discretionary. industrials up the same as health care. >> let's bring in kenny pulcari. i asked ben what to do on that 200 plus down day and he said buy. you know what? that was a great call. what do you do now if you missed it? >> i'm not sure you missed it. i think they want to take it to 1900. just until they say we take it to 1900. it's like get that number on it, people are looking for it. this is not a huge lot of volume so again, to bob's point, it's trader driven. it's algo-driven. crisis over and boom, they rush it right up. it doesn't feel like it wants to top out until -- it will test 1900, i'm sure. then i think you will see this pull back again, this churning. >> the question is whether we keep relatively quiet the next few days on this story because then we get into the nonfarm on friday. remember, people expect not a great number because of bad weather during the week they did the survey. now we are set up for if the number's better than expected, you get another potential leg up. >> on that note, here's seema mody fo
defense teams. that's his words. let's bring in cnn's barbara starr, over at the pentagon for us. we have new information, barbara, in how the u.s. sees the next few days. and these will be tense days unfolding. >> reporter: indeed they will, wolf. we have learned behind the scenes the obama administration believes some time in the next couple of days, two, three days or so, vladimir putin will make a decision on his next move. the big question is, will he put more military force into crimea or possibly into eastern ukraine. u.s. officials will tell you that if putin's intentions are quite opaque right now. anybody who knows what he's thinking probably doesn't really know. they're very concerned about it. but here's their calculation. they feel that putin has essentially consolidated his grip, if you will, on crimea. he doesn't have to put anymore into that area. but he may have to make a decision about the rest of eastern ukraine. he has 150,000 troops on the border that have been conducting that exercise. the exercise essentially over. but not all of the troops have gone back to their b
missiles in those two countries, defensive missiles, part of the missile shield, to be used against rogue regimes such as iran. although, they still don't have missiles as far as we know that have kind of range. this is starting to look like a highly destablizing moment in history. >> you are right. thhs is how regional wars get started, one thing is is not openly discussed, is that we're rely on russia for removal of our equipment from afghanistan. as president obama goes into his idea for a transition or withdrawal, if not russia, pakistan. it is jumping from pot to the fire. lou: well, pots and fires, but, this is a president right now who it is clear, was wrong in his assessment of putin, and russia's ambitions, and looks like he has underestimated his administration and our different's ability to government's a bill to respond to such an act by russia, what is or recourse now, in your judgment, as a geo political analyst? >>, we have two main tracks to follow, one is arming the other states that border russia, giving them what they need to defend. second santions track there is no ma
, when the current crisis began, the government sent its former chief of defense to the region to try to defuse the situation. a second emissary was prevented from entering the crimean rada to engage in discussions. and it is why ukrainian authorities have repeatedly reached out to russia. russia needs to reciprocate and begin to engage directly with the government of ukraine. i note that russia has implied a right to take military action in the crimea if invited to do so by the prime minister of crimea. as the government of russia well knows, this has no legal basis. the prohibition on the use of force would be rendered moot were sub-national authorities able to unilaterally invite military intervention by a neighboring state. under the ukrainian constitution, only the ukrainian rada can approve the presence of foreign troops. if we are concerned about the rights of russian-speaking minorities, the united states is prepared to work with russia and this council to protect them. we have proposed and wholeheartedly support the immediate deployment of international observers and monitors
nervous. and then we do the economic stuff, we say the defense budget. the same day the russians were saying when negotiating with new bases around the world and we will restore and revitalize the military base in the former soviet union. and then the third thing is start hitting them economically. putin has played a long game here. he wrote his graduate dissertation on how russia was going to be great again. it was going to use the economic weapon, build pipelines to europe and sell europe natural gas and therefore have clinical control. big oil revenues and windfall to pay for everything. we can go and tell them we are now going to reverse that. we're going to underwrite terminals in western europe, so the new natural gas exports can go to europe. we will talk to the central european, that whole region. we're going to help you develop that. what does it do to the price of oil? you can go down 20%. charles: to your point, russia's economy over the last ten years have been something of a jog or not. >> it will not last forever. we will put a roadblock in every single way. you do not g
. those reports are, quote, utter rubbish. ukrainian defense officials say a dozen trucks have crossed into the crimean city of kurch. president obama said the united states is examining a series of steps to to, quote, isolate russia. sanctions are being prepared even right now. we have the kind of coverage that only cnn can deliver, beginning with our chief national security correspondent jim sciutto. jim? >> clearly the administration is getting ready to act. no decision made yet on whether to impose those sanctions or, indeed, which sanctions to impose but they want to have the options ready. and today we heard the president warn that his goal is to isolate russia and make its actions in ukraine very costly. with russian troops now swarming, sovereigning ukrainian territory, preparing likely sanctions against russia. president obama vowing today to make russia's military intervention a costly proposition. >> what we're indicating to the russians is that if, in fact, they continue on the projectory that they are on, we are going to have a negative impact on russia's economy and its s
made when it comes to putin, when it comes to russia and missile defense, it has been ininterpreted as weakness. earlier garry kasparov said that as soon as obama did not follow through on the threat to use force when it came to syria, he was worried something like this might happen with putin. what do you say to critics who say that it is president obama who has projected weakness leading to a moment like this. >> first of all, i heard your interview with chairman royce and virtually everything you suggested we are doing, including working very hard at sanctions that would impose a real cost on russia, getting the international monitors in ukraine to observe what is going on and to protect people and the fact of the matter is, when it comes to sanctions, we've led the effort to put pressure on iran which has brought them to the negotiating table. the fact of the matter is, the system that weut in place to replace the one that the previous administration suggested covers more of europe more quickly than what has been in place before. we actually have a more in place as a result of t
children are afraid of your defenses. >> what started here as a protest movement has escalated beyond what most of the demonstrators could have imagined and it's not over yet. >> and now following up with the latest developments in crimea. al jazeera's jennifer glasse joins us from simferopol. jen. >> taking ore ukrainian bases really walking on i spent most of the last two days, one base about a 20 minute drive from here on the road to yalta. the two commanders have spoken a couple of times but the ukrainian commander inside the base says he won't give up. we have seen russian forces just take over some other bases digging in at the base where i was they have a camp laid out, they have -- they've got tents already. they're in for the long haul here. we've seen troops working all over town and worries tonight that there may be a deadline from the forces for the ukrainians to surrender. the rumors have been flying around all day. tensions are high. certainly we haven't seen a shot fired but certainly it is a tense situation here with russian forces and ukrainian forces facing off just a few
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